Ready for take-off?

Why it could be time to jump on board a recovery in the travel and leisure sector

Photo by Eduardo Velazco Guart

Apologies for my absence over the last week or so, which I’ve spend recovering from what I thought was a mild dose of the Omicron variant. Having suffered little during the first week with what seemed like not much more than a stinky cold, I’ve spent the second – since testing negative – feeling utterly awful. Shortness of breath, fatigue and a foggy head, thankfully now improving, has meant it’s taken all the concentration I can muster to get a few words down on paper.

Perhaps, then, the World Health Organisation is right that we should avoid the temptation to think that the pandemic is over or that Omicron is a mild disease – as I had done in week one of sniffly self-isolation. Cases are still rising in Europe and some developing world countries, like India. And my own brush with the bug leads me to think there is indeed something very un-cold-and-flu-like about it.

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The green hydrogen gamble

Environmental concerns have prompted a second look at hydrogen as a route to a greener future, but buying into the trend is expensive

I’ve spent the last couple of weeks looking at hydrogen and I have to say it is a rabbit hole I wish I had never gone down. It’s taken me hours of research and 2,000 discarded words to come to a conclusion that can be summed up in just one word: uncertain.

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Naked Wines:Attractively valued if growth gets back on track

Naked Wines has a compelling business model to exploit the growth in online wine sales. Its shares look attractive if growth gets back on track.

Photo by Kelsey Knight on Unsplash

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Tate & Lyle: Sweeter than it looks?

Focusing on more profitable and higher growth businesses is the right thing to do. Its shares look materially undervalued against its peer group.

Photo courtesy of Tate & Lyle

Tate & Lyle shares have been a horrible long-term investment. Over the last decade they have returned just 39 per cent compared to the FTSE -All Share index which has more than doubled. The shares often look cheap but have disappointed bargain hunters time and again.

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Patience is a virtue for Jet2 investors

More volatility is likely in the short-term but patience could be rewarded for those prepared to take a longer-term view.

Photo by Sean Oulashin on Unsplash

Even before Covid-19 reared its head, the airline and package holiday industries had experienced plenty of ups and downs. Both are sensitive to the economic climate and also have a reputation for struggling to balance demand and supply for their services from time to time. 

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