Sifting in a sea of pessimism

In this week’s stock screen Phil goes hunting for bargains amongst unpopular shares.

Photo by Derek Lynn on Unsplash

A lot of the time the stock market is one big popularity contest. Good companies and fast growing ones are highly prized and people feel good owning the shares of them. Others are shunned like unwanted possessions put in a charity bag.

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Weekly stock screen: Searching for Quality Income

Searching for meaningful, dependable and growing income from shares is not easy.

Photo by Matt Seymour on Unsplash

Dividend income has long been a reason for owning shares - even more so over the last decade as interest rates on government bonds and savings accounts have withered away to next to nothing.

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Weekly Stock Screen: Looking for outstanding companies regardless of price.

Don't let valuation get in the way of screening for outstanding businesses.

Photo by Matt Seymour on Unsplash

Last week I discussed some of the limitations of screening for companies based on numbers alone.

In short, there are lots of them. That said, numbers can help you in part of your quest of trying to find what you are looking for. You just have to accept that by screening on numbers you are going to miss opportunities that can be found in other ways.

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Weekly Stock Screen: Searching for quality companies at a reasonable price

In the first of our weekly stock screens, Phil attempts to unearth very good companies that may have attractive valuations.

Photo by Matt Seymour on Unsplash

This is the first in a regular weekly series of stock screens.

Before I begin, it is important to stress that I see stock screening’s sole purpose as a means of generating ideas for further research. Unless you are a quantitative investor (“quant”), you should never blindly invest based on numbers alone. 

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